Affordable BEVs in the UK

Affordable BEVs

 

Affordable BEVs in the UK

When it comes to buying an electric vehicle or any vehicle in fact – a few factors are to be considered before purchasing your new car. The higher-than-average cost of electric vehicles is often discussed and tends to be the reason that drivers don’t opt for an EV. We’re covering three affordable fully electric vehicles (BEVs) and highlighting a variety of pricing and performance statistics. This specific topic is subjective, and these three vehicles won’t be affordable to all readers – however, it is important to highlight some of the cheaper electric vehicles on the market, especially those with impressive performance stats!

MG 5 EV (2020)

The MG 5 EV is the first BEV worth covering – released in 2020 and starting at £25,095. Offering an impressive 214-mile range, it’s more than capable of covering long journeys and road trips. Boasting a modern and smart look, it is certainly an appealing car. Purchasing the MG 5 EV comes with options, different variants of the vehicle. MG 5 EV Excite, MG 5 EV Exclusive, MG 5 EV Long Range Excite and the MG 5 EV Long Range Exclusive. If you want to see the exclusive features to each model, read more at https://mg.co.uk/mg5-ev/.

When it comes to charging the MG 5, it requires a Type 2 charging cable. The MG 5 can be charged via a one-phase charging cable and charging unit at a maximum rate of 6.6kW – taking around 8 hours to charge from 0-100%. The average cost of charging from 0-100% battery (at home) is £8.48. Meaning that £8.48 can roughly get you as far as 214 miles. DC charging is also available for the MG 5 – in the form of a CCS port/charging cable. If you’re on the road and need a quick charge, rapid charging is available at certain public charge points – and your MG 5 can be charged at 80kW as a maximum rate – which could take as little time as 35 minutes to reach 80% battery!

MG 5 EV

Seat Mii Electric (2020)

The Seat Mii Electric was also released in 2020 and takes its place in the list of ‘Affordable Battery Electric Vehicles’. Available from £20,300 – the Seat Mii Electric offers an impressive 160-mile range, purely sourced from the 36.8kWh battery. The Mii also comes with some unique features, including a DriveMii App for your smartphone, lane assist, cruise control and rear parking sensors. If you want to find out more about the specifications & features of the Seat Mii Electric – read more at https://www.seat.co.uk/new-cars/mii-electric/overview.html.

When it comes to charging the Seat Mii Electric; it requires a Type 2 charging cable. With a maximum AC charge rate of 7.2Kw the Seat Mii can be charged from 0-100% battery capacity in 10 hours. Admittedly not the greatest of times, but a scheduled overnight charge should do the trick. Not to mention the astounding average price of £5.63 per 100% charge! The Mii is equipped with a CCS port also, which allows for rapid charging at specific public charge points. Using the CCS port, you could have your car charged to 80% from 0% in just over an hour!

Seat Mii Electric

Mini Electric (2020)

The third and final affordable BEV that we feel the need to include is the fabulous Mini Electric. Starting at £26,000 and offering a staggering 145-mile range – the Mini Electric is a serious contender. The ever-recognisable UK car manufacturer released the Mini Electric in 2020. Purchasing the Mini Electric comes with a lot of personalisation and customisation choices; including the ability to build your own Mini Electric. Alternatively, pre-set options are available in the form of Level 1, Level 2 and Level 3. Read more here - https://www.mini.co.uk/en_GB/home/range/models-and-options/mini-electric.html.

Charging the Mini Electric couldn’t be easier. A Type 2 charging cable is required to charge the vehicle, and this can come in the form of a one phase (maximum 7.4kW rate) or three phase cable (maximum 11kW rate). With an average charge cost of £4.99 from 0-100% battery capacity, depending on your energy supplier and other factors. DC charging is also an option for the Mini Electric via a CCS charger, which can be found at specific public charge points. Allowing a maximum rate of 49kW, the Mini Electric can be fully charged in a matter of 45 minutes.

Mini Electric

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How Secure is Your EV Charging Unit?

How Secure is Your Charging Unit?

 

How Secure is Your EV Charging Unit?

Recently, BBC published a video article highlighting specific EV charging units as being vulnerable to hackers. Specifically, they covered Wallbox and Project EV. Essentially the video stated how the specific firmware within these EV charging units were quite accessible to anyone who understands API. Meaning that potentially a hacker could take control of the charging unit and that could also lead to them having control of your home network.

Towards the back end of the video segment - the BBC got in touch with both Wallbox and Project EV to ask for these companies to address the vulnerability of the firmware in their charging units. Both companies have stated that they made changes to the firmware to increase security and to eliminate the risk of hackers taking control.

Essentially, the article highlighted the importance of consistently checking for firmware updates on your charging unit (if possible). Regardless of the manufacturer of your charging unit - it's always better to be safe and check. The Department of Transport were contacted also - as they allowed for these charging units to be sold, and under the government grant. Their statement in regards to this situation reads 'This Autumn we will be introducing new legislation designed to product consumers by mandating a range of cyber security requirements for EV charge points.'

If you'd like to view the BBC produced video segment in regards to the security of charging units - please click hereThe EV charging unit segment can be found between the timestamp of 1:50 to 9:26.

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Hyundai Ioniq 5 (2021) Overview & Charging Options

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Hyundai Ioniq 5 (2021) Overview & Charging Options

The Ioniq 5 is a fully electric vehicle (BEV) manufactured and released by Hyundai. Boasting an impressive 238 WLTP mile range and reaching from 0-62mph in just 8.2 seconds. Impressive car performance statistics; that are matched with impressive charging times/capabilities. Starting at £36,995, the Ioniq 5 can be seen as quite an affordable electric vehicle - for those wanting to take the plunge into the EV market.

When it comes to charging the Ioniq 5– it features a Type 2 and CCS charging port. Offering a maximum charge rate of 7.4kW using a one-phase fast charging cable – and a maximum charge rate of 11kW using a three-phase cable. Both cables to be used with a standard charging unit or public charge point – the cables can be purchased from 4EV. The rapid charge option of CCS allows for a maximum charge rate of 220kW, and CCS chargers can be accessed at select public charge points.

Porsche Taycan

If you don’t have access to a standard charging unit at home/work – then you could always opt for the slow charging method – which utilises an EVSE cable (3-pin domestic plug). This cable can be used with your typical household plug and allows the Ioniq 5 to be charged at a slower rate from the comfort of your own home. Again, this cable can be purchased from 4EV.

If you want to read more about the cables mentioned, or want to purchase one. The cables are listed below!

 

5M Fast Charging Standard Cable (7.2kW)

5M Three-Phase Charging Cable (11kW)

10M Portable EVSE 3-Pin Plug Cable (6A/8A/10)

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Considerations Before Buying an Electric Vehicle Charging Cable

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Considerations Before Buying an Electric Vehicle Charging Cable

When it comes to buying an electric vehicle charging cable; you, as an EV owner, have a few factors to consider before purchasing the cable. We will briefly highlight these factors, so you do not miss out on any of them when contemplating which cable suits your charging needs and vehicle.

Do you require a Type 1 or Type 2 charging cable?

Discovering whether your electric vehicle requires a Type 1 or Type 2 charging cable is of high importance. It is very easy to find out, and there are a few ways to do so. A quick search online for your vehicle’s charging type is one way. Alternatively, you can check the charging port of your EV. If the charging port has room for a connector with 5 pins, then it requires a Type 1 charging cable. However, if your charging port requires a connector with 7 pins, then your EV requires a Type 2 charging cable..

How long does your charging cable need to be?

Depending upon what cable you require – 4EV offers charging cables with a variety of lengths for you to choose from. Choosing the length of your cable is only something that you, as the EV owner will truly know – considering the length of cable you need to be able to reach your charging station or household socket. We often see 5M cables bought from 4EV, indicating that 5M is quite a comfortable length. However, it may not be a bad idea to opt for a longer cable, to insure yourself for the future if you ever require a longer cable.

Does your EV come with a charging cable? Do you want a spare?

A common error we tend to see from customers, is that they place an order for a cable, and then when their vehicle arrives – they discover they were given a cable with their vehicle. This is not necessarily a problem, but it then causes for the customer to send the cable back to us at their cost. A good way to find out, would be to contact the dealership you bought your car from, to confirm whether your vehicle comes with a charging cable (which it usually does). Do not let this stop you from buying an extra cable from us though, as you may need different cables, for different charging scenarios.

Will you be slow or fast charging your EV?

This factor is purely based on practicality and preference – it is worth considering, what speed you want to charge your electric vehicle at. You may have home-access to a standard charging unit; in that case – we would recommend opting for a fast-charging cable as you have the relevant access to charge at this rate. However, if you can only charge using a standard household 3-pin socket, then you would require one of our portable EVSE cables – which allows for slow-charging of your electric vehicle.

Is your EV capable of three-phase charging?

You may be able to charge your vehicle at a three-phase rate, which allows for faster charging than the standard one-phase. It all depends on whether your vehicle’s on-board charger, charging cable and charging unit are capable of charging at 11kW or 22kW. Again, you can find this information out via a quick internet search. Alternatively, visit our vehicle information page – which states whether your vehicle is capable of three-phase charging or not. If your vehicle is not on there; get in touch with our customer service team and we will quickly have your vehicle added to the list!

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Best Electric Vans to Consider

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Best Electric Vans to Consider

Electric cars are being invented, produced and brought to the market a lot more frequently now – and so are electric vans! Whether you require a van for personal use, or whether you work for a company that wants to take the plunge and switch to electric – you have got a wide variety of reliable electric vans to choose from.

The main things to consider when purchasing a van (typically) are time to charge, mile range and load capacity. We will cover a few notable options, highlighting all the specifications & go into depth on the individual electric van’s charging statistics.

Citroen e-Dispatch

The Citroen e-Dispatch was released in the second half of 2020, starting off at £25,053 excluding VAT. A huge selling point for the e-Dispatch is the mile range of 205 miles (if you opt for the 75kW battery). Impressively offering a WLTP range of 144 miles if you choose to stick with the standard 50kW battery. Alongside the diesel Citroen Dispatch – the e-Dispatch offers the same payload (up to 1266kg) and the same storage capacity – which varies, depending upon the variable of the e-Dispatch purchased.

When it comes to charging the e-Dispatch; it requires a Type 2 charging cable as the electric van is fitted with a Type 2 port & an additional CCS (rapid charge) port. Admirably, the vehicle can be charged at a maximum of 7.4kW using a standard ‘fast’ charging cable – which we supply at 4EV! As mentioned earlier, the vehicle is also fitted with a CCS port, which allows for the e-Dispatch to be charged up to 100Kw at specific public charge points. It is also worth mentioning that the on-board charger can be upgraded to 11kW upon purchase - allowing for a faster three-phase charge.

Nissan e-NV200

The Nissan e-NV200 (more specifically the 2018 variant) is one of the most popular electric vans to date. Trusted by the likes of DPD & other major delivery companies – the e-NV200 is worth considering. A WLTP range of 124 miles, allowing for longer-distance journeys to be safely covered. Starting at £23,505 – three different variants of the e-NV200 can be chosen from: Visia, Acenta and Tekna. Payload and storage capacity being the resulting difference between the three. A payload starting at 705kg and storage capacity of 4.2m³, the e-NV200 proves to be a great choice.

Charging the e-NV200 is slightly different to the previously covered Citroen e-Dispatch – as the e-NV200 requires a Type 1 charging cable – to be inserted into the fitted Type 1 charging port. Charging from 0-100% in 6 hours using a standard ‘fast’ charging cable – supplied here at 4EV! The onboard charger of the e-NV200 allows for a maximum usage of 6.6kW. Where the rapid charge option of CHAdeMO allows for 46Kw – and a 0-80% charge time of 40 minutes (found tethered into specific public charge points). Appropriate charging times for daily use – whether you charge at home, work or on-the-go.

View all cables for the Citroen e-Dispatch

View all cables for the Nissan e-NV200

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Porsche Taycan Overview & Charging Options

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Porsche Taycan Overview & Charging Options

The Taycan is one of Porsche’s most popular electric sellers, and it’s no surprise as to why! Released in 2020, the Taycan has taken the EV world by storm. Admittedly, it may not be an affordable vehicle to some – but arguably it lives up to the price tag (starting £83,580). Boasting a WLTP range of 254 miles & a staggering 0-62mph speed of 4 seconds – the Taycan is certainly a spectacular EV.

When it comes to charging the Taycan – it features a Type 2 and CCS charging port. Offering a maximum charge rate of 7.4kW using a one-phase fast charging cable – and a maximum charge rate of 11kW using a three-phase cable. Both cables to be used with a standard charging unit or public charge point – the cables can be purchased from 4EV. The rapid charge option of CCS allows for a maximum charge rate of 225kW, and CCS chargers can be accessed at select public charge points. 22kW on-board chargers are optional for the Taycan - which would allow for the maximum of 22kW charging, using a three-phase cable.

Porsche Taycan

If you don’t have access to a standard charging unit at home/work – then you could always opt for the slow charging method – which utilises an EVSE cable (3-pin domestic plug). This cable can be used with your typical household plug and allows the Taycan to be charged at a slower rate from the comfort of your own home. Again, this cable can be purchased from 4EV.

If you want to read more about the cables mentioned, or want to purchase one. The cables are listed below!

 

5M Fast Charging Standard Cable (7.2kW)

5M Three-Phase Charging Cable (11kW)

10M Portable EVSE 3-Pin Plug Cable (6A/8A/10)

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Charging an Electric Vehicle from a Household Socket

EVSE Thumbnail

 

Charging an Electric Vehicle from a Household Socket

When it comes to charging your electric vehicle, you tend to have a choice of where you want to charge up, and when. A lot of EV drivers have access to public charge points or standard charging units – which require a ‘fast’ standard charging cable.

Whereas another practical way of charging for a lot of people – can be using a household 3-pin plug socket. A specific cable is required, to be able to charge up via a domestic plug and we supply this cable here at 4EV! It is as simple as charging your mobile phone or any other household electrical device. The EVSE is also available for both Type 1 and Type 2 vehicles!

This method of charging is known as ‘slow’ charging – which admittedly, does not sound necessarily appealing – but it is practical as it gives you the option of charging from your very own home. The EVSE cable works at 10A as a maximum, but offers quite a cool, controlling switchable rate feature – which allows for you to choose whether you charge at 6A, 8A or 10A. The switching is simply operated by an RFID tag, which is supplied with the cable.

Another feature which allows you to have control during your charging, is the delayed timer. Ultimately, with the delayed timer – you can choose at what time your EV starts charging with the EVSE. Perfect for if you are wanting a scheduled charge every day or overnight!

All the features within the EVSE, revolve around safety and control and we always recommend this product to customers who are wanting to charge their vehicle overnight from home/work etc. Every EVSE purchased from 4EV comes with 2 RFID tags and a user’s manual which explains the features and cable in more detail. Alternatively, if you require more information – please get in touch with our support team via Live Chat or send an email to support@4ev.co.uk.

Type 1 EVSE - https://www.4ev.co.uk/10-metre-type-1-portable-evse-uk-charging-cable

Type 2 EVSE - https://www.4ev.co.uk/10-metre-type-2-ev-portable-evse-charging-cable

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Straight vs Coiled EV Charging Cables - Comparison

Charging FAQ Thumbnail

 

Straight vs Coiled Charging Cables

An important component when charging an electric vehicle, is the charging cable. Of course you require a specific type of cable to charge your vehicle; taking into account your charging source and your vehicle's charging type. If you require a fast charging cable (to be used at public charge points, and dedicated charging units) then you have the choice between a straight or coiled.

When it comes to choosing straight or coiled - ultimately, it is a personal preference for you as a consumer. There are multiple factors to be considered, which we will highlight briefly in this blog post!

Appearance

This factor, is purely personal preference and may be something that you don't consciously think about when purchasing your charging cable. A straight charging cable may be seen as more simple or tidier. Or it could be seen as plain - it's completely opinion-based. Coiled cables are naturally bulkier, which can be unappealing to some users, but could also be seen as more practical and visible.

Safety/Trip Hazard

All standard charging cables supplied via 4EV are green rather than black, to help increase visibility and reduce the risk of a trip hazard. If the cable isn't green, it will be listed in the product specifications, on the product purchase page.

Coiled cables tend to be the safer of the two - as the coil often leads to the cable being slightly elevated off the floor during a charge. This makes the cable easier to spot, as it tends to be off the ground. Another positive to take on the coiled elevation; is that the cable is less likely to be stood on or rubbed against the floor - meaning the cable may be seen as more durable and easier to keep clean.

However, as mentioned earlier - the green colouring of the straight and coiled cables allow for both style of cable to be deemed visible and not a high risk to a potential trip hazard.

Length

When it comes to selecting your cable from 4EV - we supply a variety of different length cables. Straight cables are offered at 3, 5, 7.5 and 10 metres. Coiled cables are offered at 2.5, 4 and 5 metres.

Straight cables offer a 'you get what you see' element, as a 10 metre cable can be used at 10 metres or less. Which boasts a practical, simplistic and easy to store advantage.

Coiled cables has a complication to its length. For example, you're paying for 8 metres of cable, that can only be used at a maximum of 4 metres - as the coils restrict the cable from being fully stretched to use at 8 metres. The maximum usable length will also change over time as the coils become more and more stretched after use. They are also bulkier, heavier and may be found difficult to store due to the coils. Also, because coiled cables are generally suspended off the ground between the charging station and vehicle during use, they can also put more strain on the charging sockets.

We recommend the best use for coiled cables is in a fixed position, such as a charging point in your garage at home where it is always used over the same distance. This way it can be kept permanently plugged in and is always over the same distance, before being hung up until its next use.

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Charging your Electric Vehicle - FAQ's Explained and Answered

Charging FAQ Thumbnail

 

What charging cable do I require to charge my vehicle?

When it comes to choosing your EV charging cable, there are a few things to consider. Firstly, you need to find out which charging socket your car uses. This is quite simple really - Type 1 and Type 2 are the possibilities. This information can be found out online, in your vehicle handbook or by visiting the 4EV Vehicle Information page. Alternatively, if you check the charging socket on your vehicle - a Type 1 vehicle charging socket has 5 pins, and a Type 2 charging socket has 7 pins.

Where you are wanting to charge your vehicle would be your next consideration. Whether you are wanting to charge from a 3-pin household socket, public fast charge point, commando socket, CEE socket etc - this determines which cable you need. If you visit the 4EV homepage, there is a vehicle finder feature at the top of the page which will help display all cables compatible with your vehicle. A quick scroll down on your vehicle's page shows the different types of cables & if you're still a little stuck - feel free to get in touch and we'll be happy to help.

Is it difficult to charge your electric vehicle?

No, not at all, in fact charging is quite simple. A lot of EV users may charge their vehicles overnight at home, at public charge points, at work etc – there are a lot of options when it comes to charging. Initially, admittedly it can seem quite tricky; but once you know the basics, you will be good to go!

Charging from home is a great efficient way of ensuring your electric vehicle is ready for your daily commutes – but not everyone has the option to charge from home. Whether it be through a home-installed charging unit, or a simple domestic, 3-pin plug. An alternative way of charging could be at work – which again, some people will not have as an option. Which then leaves the option to use public charging stations, which are quite quick and simple to get going with. Thousands of public charge points up and down the UK, allow for public charging to be quite a viable option, especially given the speed you can charge at.

What speed can you charge an electric vehicle at?

The answer to this question can depend on a few components used during charging. The vehicle, the charging cable and the charging unit.

 

When it comes to charging, you can charge via AC (Alternating Current) or DC (Direct Current). AC charging comes in the form of domestic charging, or public charging. Whereas DC charging offers a higher charging rate, and tends to be found in public areas, but using a CCS cable or CHAdeMO cable fixed (hardwired) into the charging unit.

Slow charging (AC - up to 3.6kW) is capable through a 3-pin domestic charging cable; often supplied by the dealership (sometimes referred to as an 'EVSE' or 'Granny Cable') when you purchase your electric vehicle. A 3-pin cable is a handy solution for EV owners who don't have a charging unit installed at home (they usually feature a built-in control box to make changes to the charge rate and to monitor any potential errors) as it still allows for their vehicles to be charged at home through a domestic socket - just at a slower rate. These cables are available for purchase at 4EV too!

 

Fast charging (AC - 16A 3.6kW / 32A 7.2kW / 3 Phase 16A 11kW / 3 Phase 32A 22kW) is capable from a dedicated charging unit, or public charge station. A standard charging cable is required for this - and tends to be the most popular option for EV owners. Again, sometimes the cable is supplied with the vehicle upon purchase - but 4EV offer these cables to purchase; whether it be for primary use or to have as a spare! Fast charging can occur at different rates between 7kW and 22kW - this again, solely depends on the capability of your charging cable, vehicle and charging unit. It's worth looking into your personal vehicle and charging unit, to see if you're able to charge at a higher kW rate!

Rapid charging (DC - 43kW-350kW) is available from specific public charge stations. The DC charging cable is fixed (tethered) into the charge stations. Referring to earlier in the blog, the cable you require is dependant upon whether your vehicle requires a Type 1 or Type 2 charging cable. Type 1 vehicles generally require CHAdeMO; whereas Type 2 vehicles generally require a CCS cable. Rapid charging is arguably more important when charging full electric vehicles with large batteries during a quick journey, rather than Plug in Hybrid vehicles whose smaller batteries can usually be topped up quick enough on a Fast charge.

Please note - there are exceptions to the CCS/CHAdeMO rule above and not all vehicles are capable of rapid charging either; it is worth looking into whether your vehicle is rapid capable and which charging station you can use.

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Volkswagen ID.4 wins 2021 World Car of the Year

VW ID.4

 

Volkswagen ID.4 wins 2021 World Car of the Year Award

It has been a great week for Volkswagen. As, Tuesday 20th April 2021 saw the new VW ID.4 crossover win this year’s World Car of the Year award – beating two other credible finalists, Honda e and the new Toyota Yaris..

The Volkswagen ID.4 is a very reputable EV already and is a more suitable choice for most EV drivers, than the less practical VW ID.3. This VW ID.4 features the ability to rapid charge at 125kW, which allows for the battery to reach 80% full in around 35-40 minutes. Self-claimed ability to charge up to 199 miles in just 30 minutes, and a total WLTP range of 310 miles – the ID.4 is rather impressive. A step in the right direction for the electric vehicle industry.

The same awards ceremony saw the Honda e take the World Urban Car award, over the Honda Jazz and Toyota Yaris – which is yet another win for electric vehicles!

To see the full list of awards, candidates and eligibility requirements for the World Car Awards 2021 – you can visit here.

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